Chick Lits Books

Women of Faith Book Club

All women are welcome!

We meet every other month at different homes. If you wish to join us or would like to be put on the email list for future books, dates, and location please email Peggy Giordano at peggygior@gmail.com.


Schedule

Cottage Meeting- Wednesday, March 3rd, 7pm-This Zoom gathering will be lead by Lynn Wong as part of the church transition committee’s goal to hear about our fears, hopes, and dreams for the future of our congregation. Please join in and share your thoughts.
 
 
April 6, 2021 – “Shalom Sistas” by Osheta Moore
 
In Shalom Sistas, Moore shares what she learned when she challenged herself to study peace in the Bible for forty days. Taking readers through the twelve points of the Shalom Sistas’ Manifesto, Moore experiments with practices of everyday peacemaking and invites readers to do the same. From dropping “love bombs” on a family vacation, to talking to the coach who called her son the n-word, to spreading shalom with a Swiffer, Moore offers bold steps for crossing lines between black and white, suburban and urban, rich and poor.
 
June 1, 2021 – ” Homegoing” by Yaa Gyasi
 
Two half-sisters, Effia and Esi, are born into different villages in eighteenth-century Ghana. Effia is married off to an Englishman and lives in comfort in the palatial rooms of Cape Coast Castle. Unbeknownst to Effia, her sister, Esi, is imprisoned beneath her in the castle’s dungeons, sold with thousands of others into the Gold Coast’s booming slave trade, and shipped off to America, where her children and grandchildren will be raised in slavery. One thread of Homegoing follows Effia’s descendants through centuries of warfare in Ghana, as the Fante and Asante nations wrestle with the slave trade and British colonization. The other thread follows Esi and her children into America. From the plantations of the South to the Civil War and the Great Migration, from the coal mines of Pratt City, Alabama, to the jazz clubs and dope houses of twentieth-century Harlem, right up through the present day, Homegoing makes history visceral, and captures, with singular and stunning immediacy, how the memory of captivity came to be inscribed in the soul of a nation.